My Month in Sustainable Fashion: May

Making Your Own

A couple of months ago, I wanted to get back into sewing so I started some classes again and collecting pieces of fabric from thrift shops and from members of the family who for some reason had a lot laying around. This Japanese silk is delicate, quite old and in immaculate condition. When it was passed over to me by a family member, I knew I wanted to make them into pyjamas. Here is the finished product. I’m so proud of them and on the theme of sustainable; what a perfect way to be sustainable; using some deadstock, your own materials and being absolutely responsible for what you’re doing.

A Stroll

What I’m wearing:

Black Dress: This dress is a fabulous thrift find, £1! It’s a 90s St Michaels treasure

Shoes: Old Birkenstocks

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Walking with Trees

What I’m wearing:

Frill Cotton Dress: People Tree, a beautiful brand that inspired me to stop buying fast fashion when they featured on the Netflix documentary, The True Cost. They’re advocates for fair trade, sustainbility, honesty in the fashion industry and last but no means least, using organic materials. I urge you to read more here. People Tree can also be found on ASOS.

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Two Celebrations

What I’m Wearing:

Outfit I

Crochet White Top: Thrifted

Floral Flares: Vintage

Outfit 2

Floral Rose Dress: TK Maxx

White T Shirt: Cheap Monday

Leather Jacket: Thrifted

Denim Jacket: Thrifted

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We Love Flowers

What I’m Wearing:

Floral Red Top: Thrifted (Another £1 great find!)

Indigo Jeans: Vintage

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Perfect Yellow

What I’m Wearing:

Yellow White Jumper: Thrifted

Pink Corduroy Jumpsuit: Nobody’s Child; another sustainble brand who are reponsible when it comes to their fabrics; how they’re dyed and printed in their own facilities. It is not entirely clear why there clothing is much more affordable than most sustainable brands so it’s hard to say just how ethical they are.

Yellow Wicker Bag: Gift

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